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Art, Analytics, and AI

Perspectives on the Future of the Art World

Art, Analytics, and AI

Artistic passion and love have brought Elisabeth Condon and Karl Kelly together as both artists and partners. The pair has collaborated on several projects in the past, including the Lattice Views mural project sponsored by Norte Maar. But how do they feel about analytics and artificial intelligence in the world of art?

 

In this exclusive interview, we dive into the minds of Condon and Kelly to explore their unique perspectives on an analytics project carried out by students at Georgia Tech. Through the analysis of dominant and secondary colors in artwork based on region of origin, art period, or time, the project aimed to shed light on the impact of analytics in the world of art.

 

As the couple shares their thoughts on the future of AI in the art world, we get a glimpse into how their shared passion for art has influenced their relationship. Join us as we embark on a journey into the world of art, analytics, and AI with Elisabeth Condon and Karl Kelly.

Beyond the Canvas: How Elisabeth Condon and Karl Kelly See Art Analytics Shaping the Future of Art

 

The couple reviewed an analytics project conducted by Georgia Tech students that analyzed the relationships between dominant and secondary colors in artwork based on region of origin, art period, or time. The project used data-driven approaches to investigate patterns and correlations, shedding light on the ways in which color plays a significant role in the world of art. Through this project, the students were able to provide valuable insights into the use of color in various art movements, regions, and time periods, offering a fresh perspective on the history of art.

Elisabeth Condon saw value in the analytics project and the data it produces. She expressed gratitude for the project, stating “I want to thank you for doing this project” and highlighting the usefulness of the data in teaching art. For example, she suggests that “if I had a painting class with kids just coming to paint, I could hand them that report and say, ‘use this palette to make a painting, not this painting, but with the same subject matter’.” However, she warns against relying too heavily on machines and losing the human element in art. She states, “it’s really important that we have access to something else beyond ourselves, but not to look towards it as any kind of saving grace, just as an alternative.”

Karl Kelly, on the other hand, expressed skepticism about the ability of machines to make art, stating that “art needs a consciousness” and that machines lack the imagination to create something truly new. In his view, “it’s good at playing games, it can play chess, it can do this. But it doesn’t have the, you know, the imagination, I guess that would come with a consciousness of just random things that feed into making.”

These two perspectives on the analytics project and the future of AI in art are complex and nuanced. While they appreciate the potential value of analytics and AI in the art world, they also caution against relying too heavily on machines and losing the human element in art. With their expert insights, Elisabeth Condon and Karl Kelly offer us a glimpse into the intersection of art and technology, and how the two can coexist in harmony.

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From Matisse to Jeff Koons: How Art Shapes the Relationship of Elisabeth Condon and Karl Kelly

The fascinating duo also share a deep passion for art, which has brought them together as both artists and partners. They first bonded over their shared admiration for Matisse’s Bathers by a River in the Art Institute of Chicago’s collection, and have since explored numerous exhibitions and art shows together.

Their shared passion for art has also influenced their relationship on a personal level. Condon describes how they would “go out for beer” after attending lectures by visiting artists like Peter Halley, discussing the intersection of theory and painting. Their experiences in the art world have also shaped their perspectives on the evolving art scene. Condon recalls being blown away by Jeff Koons’ exhibition at Donald Young gallery in Chicago, which she saw as an example of art that includes social critique within the work itself.

Their artistic pursuits have taken them in different directions, with Condon showing a particular interest in theory and Kelly in painting. However, they have collaborated on several projects in the past, including the Lattice Views mural project sponsored by Norte Maar. According to Condon, the project was “the most significant thing we did together” and involved a team of painters working together to create a 400-foot mural in Highland Park, Cypress Hills. She added that the pair “each took turns on the murals,” along with “some really fabulous painters in the neighborhood” who were able to make her vision into a beautiful reality. Condon’s leadership and artistic vision helped bring the project to life, and her partnership with Kelly and other local painters helped ensure its success.

Their experiences working together on the Lattice Views project reflect the power of art to bring people together and create something meaningful for the community. While their individual pursuits may differ, their shared passion for exploring the world of art together has brought them closer as both artists and partners.

Fluorescent Oil Paint and the Future of Art

Elisabeth Condon reflects on the future of the art world, “I can only think of painting now. I mean, there’s fantasy. You know, I can project what I’d like to see. But I don’t really know what the future holds, particularly with the rise of AI-generated art. From the art world I came of age in, print magazines were the lingua franca. But now with the constant flow of information and social media, it’s difficult to predict what direction the art world will take.”

Karl Kelly shares his thoughts on the future of the art world, “I think the future of the art world is in the hands of the younger generation. As I get older, my focus has become more inward, and my art reflects my personal concerns. It’s not necessarily related to what’s happening in the broader art world.”

Elisabeth Condon comments on the popularity of fluorescent oil paint, “Karl makes fluorescent oil paint, which is not light fast and is known to fade over time. Some companies are more hesitant to produce it, but the demand for these bright, eye-catching colors is too great. I think it has to do with the rise of people’s desire for pumped-up colors. Karl started making paint again to meet this demand, and I think that’s relevant to the future of the art world.”

Karl Kelly explains the nature of fluorescent oil paint, “It’s the pigment that causes it to glow under black light. The pigment absorbs ultraviolet light and lets it back out as visible light, making the colors appear brighter than they actually are. But over time, the electrons within the pigment become overly agitated and stop doing this, resulting in a duller appearance.”

When asked about how galleries display fluorescent oil paint, Karl Kelly responds, “Directly Jacqueline Humphries has done some paintings that use black light, as have other artists. In the past, Frank Stella created huge fluorescent paintings in the ’60s that are still shown today, although they’ve likely been repainted several times.”

In a world where technology is rapidly advancing, the role of analytics and AI in the art world is becoming increasingly significant. As demonstrated by Elisabeth Condon and Karl Kelly, artists and art lovers alike can offer unique insights into the intersection of art and technology. While some express skepticism about the ability of machines to make art, others see the value in the data and insights they can provide. As the future of AI in the art world remains uncertain, it is clear that the human element of art will always remain vital. Through their shared passion for art and unique perspectives on the evolving art scene, Condon and Kelly remind us of the importance of creativity, imagination, and innovation in shaping the art of the future.